Putting the Stupid in Stupid Design

Here’s some wrongheaded architecture for you. Casa Mia in Ultimo. 

Penultimite #1 has lived in this monstrous Meriton building for about six months.
Penultimite #2 has lived here for over three years.

And try as we might, NEITHER OF US CAN FIGURE OUT HOW TO ACCESS THE COURTYARD OF THIS BUILDING. 

Casa Mia has multiple entrances, many peculiar winding corridors and wasted-space passages, and it does some strange split-level things, owing to its position on a hill.

It also has an amazing assortment of the UGLIEST TILES IN SYDNEY, but that’s another story.  

Now, we can accept this building’s ugliness as a par-for-the-course Meriton atrocity, but the thing that really gets to us is the fact that this courtyard could have been really rather nice.

What would help? Well, being able to access it, via means other than abseiling, would really help. Is a door and a little signage too much to ask? 

And, you know, once we’ve abseiled down, and untangled ourselves from our harnesses, we’re really like to sit down.

So how about some seats and tables? We thought the no. 1 rule for making pleasant (semi) public spaces was seating. But perhaps that’s an implicit intention — the courtyard is not for people to sit around and make noise in - it’s purely there to bring a little sunlight in, and therefore allow many more small units to be contained on this block of land. This is design that is almost purely pitched at getting a Development Application approved, and fitting in as many sellable apartments as possible. 

One neighbour has told us that there is a BBQ out there in the courtyard, but we NEVER EVER see people out there. Except for one dude — the building maintenance guy, who unhelpfully uses a f—-ing leaf-blower out there for several hours, EVERY MONDAY.